Topics, weighting, and more for the physics course covered in high school.

Syllabus for Physics, Grade 12 | Context

According to data from the 11th and 12th grade AISHE (All India Survey on Higher Education), science is the second most popular stream. According to AISHE, 47.13 million Indian students are enrolled in some form of science-related programme. In this concentration, students learn the fundamentals of science and gain an in-depth familiarity with the world’s many physical and natural phenomena. With a solid grounding in Science from grades 11 and 12, students can also pursue a number of one-of-a-kind study and discovery possibilities. When it comes to the natural sciences, physics is widely considered one of the most challenging topics to study. Knowing the paper and curriculum inside and out is crucial preparation for the MPSC exam, as it is for other national-level examinations. Read on to learn about the units and themes that make up the class 12 Physics curriculum and how the marks are distributed.

Topics, units, and chapters for a physics curriculum at the high school level

The subjects, modules, and chapters of the class 12 Physics curriculum are organised into sections. There are chapters for each each unit, and each one explains a different idea in great detail.

Electrostatics, Part I
This section has two parts, as listed below:

Electric Charges and Fields, First Chapter
This chapter covers some rather substantial ground, including:

Potential differences
Indicator: Charge Conservation
the law of coulomb
Power exerted by a collection of charges
Dispersion of Charge in a Continual Flow
Dipole electric field
Two: Capacitance and Electrostatic Potential
This chapter covers some rather substantial ground, including:

Magnetomotive force
Insulators and conductors
Possible variation
Disbursements at no cost and fixed costs
Level sets and equipotential surfaces
Electrified polarisation and dielectrics
Subunit II: Direct Current
The contents of the single chapter that makes up this section are as follows:

Power and Current 3rd Chapter

This chapter covers some rather substantial ground, including:

Electrified Velocity of Drift
Power and resistance in electricity
Variation in resistance with temperature
Laws of Kirchhoff as seen from the Wheatstone Bridge

Third Unit: Current and Its Magnetic Effects

This section has two parts, as listed below:

Moving Charges and Magnetism, Chapter 4

This chapter covers some rather substantial ground, including:

The Experiment of Oersted
Biot-Savart The theory behind a closed circuit carrying a current and how it is applied in practise
Cyclotron
Toque exerted on a current loop within a constant magnetic field
An Inverse Moving Coil Galvanometer
Pressure exerted on a conductor carrying a current and located in a magnetic field of constant strength.

The Forces of Magnetism and Matter, Part 5

This chapter covers some rather substantial ground, including:

The magnetic dipole moment
An electron’s magnetic dipole and dipole moment as it spins
Magnitude of the magnetic field
Influence of a torque on a magnetic dipole (example – bar magnet)
Similar to a solenoid but with a bar magnet
a force exerted by the planet’s magnetic field
Chapter 4: Alternating Currents and Electromagnetic Induction
This section has two parts, as listed below:

Induction of Electromagnetic Fields (Chapter 6)

This chapter covers some rather substantial ground, including:

Introduction to oneself and others
It’s all according to Lenz’s Law
Convection currents and the laws of induction and electromagnetic induction known as the “Faraday”

Alternating Current, Section 7

This chapter covers some rather substantial ground, including:

Measured alternating current and voltage at their peak and root-mean-square values
Difference between reactance and impedance
In a series LCR circuit, the power factor
Voltage-free current
Waves of Electromagnetic Energy
There is only one chapter in this unit, and it is entitled:

Electronic Radiation and Transmission of Information

This chapter covers some rather substantial ground, including:

Present due to relocating charge
Properties of electromagnetic waves
Spectra electromagnetic

Optics, Section VI

There are two parts to this section:

A Look into Ray Optics and Optical Devices

This chapter covers some rather substantial ground, including:

Light refraction
Reflecting surfaces shaped like spheres
Interference of light rays at spheres
Light scattering
Microscopes and astronomical telescopes are both examples of optical instruments.

A Look at Wave Optics (10th Chapter)

This chapter covers some rather substantial ground, including:

What the Wavefront and the Huygens Principle Have in Common
Double-slit experiment by Young
Light diffraction caused by a single slit interference
The law of Brewster
The Polaritons: Lesson 7: The Two-Faced Nature of Radiation and Matter
This section includes the following chapter:

It’s a Two-Faced Universe: Radiation and Matter in Chapter 11

This chapter covers some rather substantial ground, including:

An Example of the Photoelectric Effect
The findings of Lenard and Hertz
The Einstein formula
Unit 8: Atoms and Nuclei Wave Particle Duality and the De Broglie Relation
This section has two parts, as listed below:

To the Atoms!

This chapter covers some rather substantial ground, including:

Experimental scattering of alpha particles
An Atomic Model Based on Rutherford’s Ideas
Bohr’s atomic model
Hydrogen’s Rainbow

Nuclei, Section 13

This chapter covers some rather substantial ground, including:

Radiation Alpha, beta, and gamma particles and rays Nucleus composition and size
A Law for Radioactive Decay
Conversion of mass to energy
Failure in the population as a whole
Fusion and fission in the nucleus

Subunit 9: Electronics

The physics curriculum for grade 12 culminates in a single chapter titled “The Final Unit”

Devices, Materials, and Basic Circuits in Semiconductor Electronics

This chapter covers some rather substantial ground, including:

Conductors have varying energy levels, or “bands.”
The forward and reverse bias I-V properties of semiconductors and insulators
A rectifier unit, or diode, is what this device is used for.
Exam Scores Should Be Distributed Wisely
Here is how you may expect your final physics exam marks to break down:

Electromagnetic Waves and Optical Units

We obtained a total of 17 points.

Quantities: Radiation and Matter, Atoms and Nuclei

There were a total of 11 points possible.

Electronic Gadgets as Measured in Units

Overall grade: 7

Electric Charges and Fields, and Electrical Current Units

Overall score: 17

Electromagnetic induction, alternating current, and the magnetic effects of a current all have their own units.

A total of 18 points was awarded.

As a whole, the physics theory exam is worth a total of 70 points.

The sum of the practical exam’s marks in physics is 30.

This is your final physics exam score out of a possible 100.

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